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of great britain on his arm, and then the ambassador would come with the president's hostess on his arm, a wife if there was a wife. jefferson had the rule: he who is next to the door goes in first. this created a diplomatic flap because the ambassador of great britain was just outraged at this. c-span: again, you--you're writing about people who were born between 1776 and 1800. >> guest: yes. c-span: so the focus--the years that you're really focused of them being old enough to be involved, would be what? >> guest: well, i would say really the first three decades of the 19th century. c-span: 1800 to 1830? >> guest: mm-hmm. mm-hmm. i have material on the 1790s because it's a very tumultuous decade and it's important, and there are some of them who, by that time, are in their 20s. but, yes, most of the action. c-span: give us a profile on what the united states looked like in those 30 years: people, where they had come from, what their religion was. >> guest: well, to give a profile of a country that was as rambunctious as american society in those decades is going to be very hard. i can
programs in britain. no question that does help. but the fundamental thing is that it doesn't matter who you are, what you are, that you do want to go out to some kind of live event and people like the idea. they can't sit in front of their computers and play games and twitter all the time. people actually do like the thought of going to a space where they hear the reaction of other people and they can hear -- you're part of a communal experience in the theater. >> how about many of your colleagues in the theater. you're not snobbish about talent shows. you've been a judge on shows. you've been a mentor on "american idol". can they produce bona fide stars? >> yes, they can. and the real thing which i found in britain, more difficult to do here, of course, because it's such a big country, people think it's odd why if i live in san francisco vote for a girl who might be going to the "wizard of oz" on broadway. kids were coming from background where they couldn't see me in an audition. >> you saw that on "american idol" when you mentored that as well. you would see these kids that come from
in peril britain was at the end of the 20 century. to discuss this, my colleague spoke to an economist, the author who left after taking part in protests in 1989, and a writer on risk in geopolitics. first, we take stock of how the land lies. >> the paramount fear -- the crowd is diverse the of all code come to take part in a production of a change their lives. they call it naturalization here. to you and me, that means becoming a u.s. citizen. cheesy, yes, to see one of the ceremonies is to grasp the essence of america. >> this is one of those only in america plummets. this is part of a living -- legal process. this is all wrapped into kind of a movie experience. it says, "i am honored to congratulate you on becoming a citizen of the united states. because of your determination, this great nation, is now your nation, sign, sincerely, barack obama." >> america is vexed by doubts, but that has not put them off. fresh blood is coming faster than ever before. >> the racism and everything you encounter, i don't feel that here. >> they give me so much freedom. freedom to do anything i want.
for greatness and also pushes and support this project leaders to envision britain is in themselves. -- greatness in themselves. [applause] [applause] michellechu, 17, is a committed youth board member and on the youth empowerment advisory board. she is a college-bound ambassador in march from mentor school, where she is a wonderful model tutor. michelle is a responsible and motivated later working to bring you up voice to her community. [applause] nataliegranados, 18, has been a leader in the grenada movement where she had been in the budget crisis and have bravely spoken at the bourse supervisors. she has advocated for sense of participation and funding to be restored to our city's quality youth programs. [applause] [applause] roblin bonner, 18, is an outspoken member of the youth leadership. roblin graduated from downtown high where she was a passionate role model and advocated for youth to be more engaged in the political process. [applause] [applause] -- 17, pawlenty first single occupancy sro in the chinatown development center. he also wrote a grant proposal to create a bilin
. they're all in place. everything is fine. we're not going back. >> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge celebrated canada day with thousands of people in the capital os awafment on the first day, prince william told the parliament on parliament hill he was excited of the prospect by coming part of the canadian family as they traveled around the country. from ottawa, we have this report. >> they are young and glamorous, which undoubtedly helps but to be a successful royal requires more. things like a sense of service and ability to connect with people, because that lifts them belong mere celebrity. william and kate arrived at the annual canada day celebration in a horse-drawn carriage. the crowds were large, the welcome once again enthusiastic. as the queen's representative in canada, the governor general mounted the podium, the crowd shouted for will and kate. they made their way to the stage giving the crowd a chance to see kate was wearing canada's national colors of red and white. canada's prime minister congratulated them on their marriage. the crowd cheered, dignitarie
't have any. >> right. >> britain would not have gone to war in iraq. maybe the united states would. >> stephen: i don't know. are the facts important there. because i have to be a fan of facts. because feeling is first. and it felt right to get saddam, did it not feel like -- seems like a bad guy, seemed dangerous. feels like take them down. later the facts subverted that good feeling. so what good are the facts? >> in subverting that good feeling. >> stephen: you want to make me feel bad. >> i want to make you feel bad. >> stephen: really. >> stephen: if you feel that way. i believe in the reality-based community. i mean --. >> stephen: reality is pretty sad. >> stephen: it can be but then we have more need of comedians. >> stephen: you know what f you find a good one, tell me about him. >> where might i look. >> stephen: jon stewart. (laughter) he's really funny. he's really funny. let me ask you, political writing from a decade without a name this past decade, you mean. >> it's a weird decade which in a way begins with 9/11 and i think ends on the fourth of november 2008 when ba
and richard, always on point with their legal arguments there. so britain's new duke and duchess of cambridge are on their first official foreign trip together. the first stop, canada. so we have a question for you. how many time is queen elizabeth visited canada? we'll have an answer for you after the break. [ woman ] we take it a day at a time. that's how it is with alzheimer's disease. she needs help from me. and her medication. the exelon patch -- it releases medication continuously for twenty-four hours. she uses one exelon patch daily for the treatment of mild to moderate alzheimer's symptoms. [ female announcer ] it cannot change the course of the disease. hospitalization and rarely death have been reported in patients who wore more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases. patients may experience loss of appetite or weight. patients who weigh less than 110 pounds may experience more side effects. people at risk for stomach ulcers who ta
. britain couple tom's cabin to try to prevent that. unfortunately in effect it made slavery more entrenched because it made this out very defensive about slavery, even as it turned the north toward antislavery. so it had this effect. it startled her. some became more better. petitions to politicians. she was mentioned in political speeches. it was really a growing division so finally win don brown comes along, even though she had created it gentle on "tom she calls john brown in 1869 the greatest american that ever lived. like a former pacifist, henry david thoreau who rick -- who wrote his entire essay in his earlier years which influences more nitpicking and gondi. but henry david thoreau is greater than any of the founding fathers. there is no man who has ever lived to has done more for the honor of the american name. she knew about his violence in kansas and is violence. but by that time she knew the very sad truth that only violence was going to end slavery. it took the death of more than 620,000 americans to end slavery. that is how deeply entrenched slavery had become in america. sad
of cheap lit which are. -- literature. the plays, of course, when stowe landed in this britain, in liver pool in 1853 to visit britain, there were ten versions of "uncle tom's cabin" on stage in london on the day she landed. >> right. >> imagine that. so i think it's a fascinating, um, summary -- and i don't mean to simplify this -- summary of the impact of that book in so many ways. >> yeah. well, i can't really think of another novel, um, and i love so many novels, and i teach so many novels, and i love them all. but i can't think of another one that had the impact of "uncle tom's cabin." you know, where does one begin? it's now translated into over 70 languages, and every year even now new editions and new languages keep coming out. t just an incredible -- it's just an incredible international phenomenon. again, where do you begin? in russia there were 57 editions published there. well, first it was banned in russia because it was considered a subversive novel. but then in 1867 it was published and then 57 -- and it was lenin's favorite novel. and it directly influenced the emancipati
it just feels different than britain's wills and kates? sfli think charlene has a hard act to follow. it was such a fantastic wedding they had in britain, and also, charlene wittstock and prince albert have been hampered by the crazy rumors coming out of monaco this week that she was possibly a runaway bride that, she may have actually tried to go to the airport and fly back to south africa when had he sh heard some odd stuff, perhaps about prince albert's recent past. none of that, alex, is verified, even though newspapers, as respected as la mone have talked about it. there's no hard evidence to say she was a runaway bride or the wedding today will be anything less than spectacular, and they'll live happily ever after. zoo make a good point about her living in kate's shadow right now, but particularly there in monaco what about the shadow of grace kelly? >> well, if it weren't for kate middleton, the most enormous shadow, you're right, is grace kelly, who also came to monaco. she was younger than charlene when had he married prince reiner. she was really cultivated and sophisticate
today. in fact, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before wend the rebuttal portion of this deba, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a ntury of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so th
breakfast today. >>> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge, better known as prince william and wife kate are in canada to celebrate the nation's 144th birthday. all along they're treated like rock stars, people lining up for hours to catch a gliches of the young couple. coming up the latest on the royal tour. >> going from here to southern california, in a few days. a whirlwind trip of north america coming up. i don't think pippa is with them. >> pippa is not with them. >> didn't travel with them for the heck of it. >> she doesn't want to steal attention from kate probably. >> i see. >> or something like that. >> that's right. victoria arbiter will be here, our pal to talk about the royal stuff. i wonder how that will be like for them. kate has never been to north america. >> first trip here. they're on camera all the time and still manage to look good no matter what. >> got the whole thing down, working it well. for some your local news is next. for others stick around. your local news is next. >>> the general motors building on this saturday, july the 2nd. welcome to "the early show."
. >>> and then in canada, a royal welcome for britain's royal newlyweds, prince william and his wife catherine have been there since thursday. first stop, ottawa. today, montreal. our report ser there. the duke and duchess have charmed the crowds there. and that little maple leaf on her topper set the tone, didn't it? >> reporter: she's been getting her clothes right all the way through. she's worn that white dress before. it was just from a regular shop in london. she's doing things her own way on this royal trip. the scenes were fantastical. three times as many people turned out in ottawa than last year because the royal couple were there. they're about to hit the circuit again. in the next hour, they're going to be planting a tree in ottawa symbolizing their longlasting love. and then they're going to the war and veteran museum. and then they're heading up to montreal, they're going to be going to a children's hospital. they're both very good with children. it's going to be very emotional for them. then they end up here a little later on at a culinary school. william's a great cook. we're going to se
it creates an unwelcome environment for people of color. >> great britain's prince william and kate are now in quebec. the third day of their planned nine day journey across canada. the newlyweds were greeted today by a small group of separatists. >>> the dramatic murder trial of casey anthony is there'sing an end. jurors expected to begin deliberations and work through the july 4th holiday. >> reporter: closing arguments in the case begins sunday. the final day in a trial that has captivated the nation. what be began as a missing child search has grown into a 24 hour soap opera. >> it is about sex lies and videotape. >> reporter: as the defense rested the judge explained to casey her rights to testify. >> you understand that your decision to testify or not testify is solely your decision and your decision alone? >> yes, sir. >> and it is your decision not to testify? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: in the prosecution's rebuttal a state witness said cindy anthony was at work not at home when someone used casey's computer to search for the word color -- chloroform. . >> >> do the business works of
problem. we never wanted to dominate them. so we they ever were trying to do what britain and russia failed to do. we didn't want to do that. we did want to nation build. and it was an honorable thing to do. and we may or may not succeed. and i think what the president said, we're going to try to keep those folks as safe as responsible and get it over with as quick as we can. >> i'm wrapping it up. i recently went with the secretary of state, hillary clinton, to paris, cairo and tunis and watched her closely just as i used to watch you closely when you were president of the united states. and watching her in those meetings, watching her in those sessions, i saw a lot of bill clinton when he was president of the united states. and here's the question. did she learn from you or did you learn from her? >> well, i would hope a little bit of both. but i've learned a great deal from her. when i fell in love with her and asked her to marry me, i said almost in the same breath you probably shouldn't do this because i have to go home to arkansas and live my life. and i think you're the most g
and clashed with riot police. >>> on to canada, the royal visit. britain's prince william and katherine are in montreal today. day three of the first official trip abroad as man and wife. they are coming to the united states afterwards. >>> and as long as we're talking about royal couples, prince albert of monaco is now a married man. he and south african born charlene wittstock were legally married yesterday during a civil ceremony but held a religious service today in monte carlo. >>> the president of venezuela will stay out of his country for a bit longer. hugo chavez made a shocking announcement this week publicly acknowledging a grim rumor that had been swirling about his health. >> reporter: this is how president chavez looks today. it is a different chavez from the one first elected president 13 years ago. then he was the youngest head of state in his country's history. today, he is battling cancer. this video was released on friday and shows him working. but he is not in caracas. he is far away from his palace in havana where he is receiving cancer treatment. this is a powerful
their earnings in emerging markets. >> let's go there. we worry about the world. we see britain, we see greece. we worry that there isn't growth elsewhere. in emerging market there's hot growth. you're part of the 36% who doesn't think the u.s. economy will do well. you're worried about some parts of the global economy. how do i tap into those places really growing? >> you want to buy an emerging markets fund. if you look at asia and parts of latin america, it is a powerful story. the transfer of wealth, the growth of the middle class. they are where we were in the 1950s. you would buy something like the lazard emerging markets fund. either one of those are good but they are a cadillac of emerging markets investing and they do their research and they're in the good geographies and the growth is powerful and long term. >> when you say they're like we were, they're buying things, consumption is still high in a lot of these places. >> we have a lot of debt at the consumer level and the federal level. they are growing their wealth. they have high savings. they're now buying tooth paste and technol
. >>> well, 36 minutes past the hour now. in canada, a royal welcome for britain's royal newlyweds. prince william and his wife, the duchess of cambridge now have been there since thursday. the first stop was ottawa, but now today in montreal. our max foster is there, as well. tell us what they've been up to so far in canada and what do they have left on this trip? >> reporter: well, you saw these particular scenes yesterday, on canada day, down in ottawa. normally 100,000 people turn up to those celebrations at that concert there. 300,000 turned up. so three times as many people showed up just because william and catherine were there. to give you an idea commentary here, this is one of the newspapers, and their headline was "our royal crush." very, very popular so far. >> the royal crush, as you say. but this is the stop in canada now, but they are going to head over to california as well. what are we expecting there? >> reporter: yeah, they certainly are, and there's going to be a series of visits there. all about promoting uk interests, and a lot of interests there, obviously, and lots
to get his daughter back. he says his ex-fiancee kidnapped the girl and is now living in britain and he is fighting for his child's return. the father bart homer joins us exclusively. but first nbc's charles hadlock has more on this international custody battle. >> reporter: 2-year-old alessia was born in texas. that's about the only fact her parents can now agree on. >> just doesn't make sense. >> reporter: bart hermer still carries a pacifier in his pocket. a simple reminder of a doubter he can only see now in home videos. hermer met simone while on a singles cruise in italy and quickly fell in love. but before a wedding could be planned, alessia was born. by then, hermer had lost his job in a down economy. the couple decided to spend several months at her home in england. after a brief trip to the states, they encountered a british emigration officer on their return to the uk. simone and alessia were admitted, but because he had no job, no income, hermer was turned away. >> he accepted my passport, stamped it, said you're going home on the next flight. my mouth dropped open. >> repor
host this weekend to britain's prince william and his new bride. don't they just look fabulous? 21-gun salute in ottawa to welcome the duke and duchess of cambrid cambridge. the royal couple arrived thursday in time to watch most of the canada day festivities. they will be in canada a few more days before they head to california. >>> we turn now to libya where the leader there moammar gadhafi is threatening to take the fight to europe in retaliation for repeated nato air strikes against his forces. nato has also bombed several buildings in the capital of tripoli calling them military targets. here is gadhafi making the threat on libyan state tv. >> translator: people of libya might exceed your houses and offices, your families, all of them will be fair military targets. the same way you turned our offices, our headquarters, our house, our children, you turned them to legitimate military targets. we will treat you the same. i eye for eye, ear for an ear, a drop for a drop. a family for a family, house for a house. a headquarter for a headquarter. if we decided, we are able to move to eu
closely on the counter terrorism issues. earlier this week it was revealed that pakistan ordered britain to withdraw some of its training teams from the country. that was not mentioned today but they emphasize cooperation between the two countries. and he goes to office is trying to reassure the people that he is still in charge and running everything from cuba. just yesterday he announced that doctors in cuba removed a cancerous tumor from his body some time ago. it is from venezuela in a turmoil with rival politicians jockeying for power. more news after the break. >> the nfl players and owners are at odds over how to share the billions of dollars that flow into the leak every year. --league every year. >> we are nearly four months and to the lockout and no deal in place as the owners and players try to figure out to split up $9 billion in annual revenue. fans are getting testy, but that will be putting it mildly. and nationally known and if those forecaster offers his take. >> i like to think that prudent heads will prevail and coming up with something that is a win-win situation a
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)